Family Health Care of Ellensburg

107 E Mountain View Avenue

Ellensburg, WA 98926

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Vaccines

EVERY YEAR...

  • 3 MILLION DEATHS ARE PREVENTED

  • 400 MILLION YEARS OF LIFE ARE SAVED

  • 750,000 CHILDREN ARE SAVED FROM DISABILITY

...DUE TO VACCINES

RECOMMENDED VACCINES

Whether it's a flu shot or a vaccination for pneumonia, whooping cough or meningitis, we can help. We offer vaccines for children, adolescents, and adults. Family Health Care strongly encourages immunizations as recommended by the CDC, and we encourage you to discuss all immunizations thoroughly with your primary care provider.

VACCINES FOR CHILDREN

In the State of Washington, all ACIP-recommended vaccines are provided at no cost to pediatric patients, although there is a charge for the administration of the vaccine which differs depending on the type of appointment and the type of insurance. This administration fee is billed to insurance. With the exception of walk-in flu shots, we recommend obtaining pediatric vaccines during routine Well Child Checks. 

FLU VACCINE 

The annual flu vaccine is recommended for everyone 6 months and older. Getting a flu vaccine is the first and most important step of protecting against influenza. Influenza is not the same thing as the stomach flu (gastroenteritis). Although it is often call the stomach flu, it is not caused by influenza viruses. Gastroenteritis is an infection caused by a variety of viruses that can cause diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea and vomiting. Real flu (influenza) attacks your respiratory system – your nose, throat and lungs – causing fever, muscle aches, coughing and congestion. Influenza and its complications can be deadly. A flu vaccine is needed every year because flu viruses are constantly changing. The flu vaccine is formulated each year to keep up with the flu viruses as they change. Most years, flu vaccines are available at Family Health Care around the first of September. As long as supplies last, we continue to offer the flu vaccine throughout the “flu season” which usually ends in April or May. Patients can walk-in to receive their flu vaccine without an appointment.

VACCINES SAVE LIVES

Vaccines are one of the greatest medical success stories in human history because they have saved millions of lives and prevented illness and lifelong disability in millions more.

 

Many serious childhood diseases are preventable by using vaccines routinely recommended for children. 

WHAT ARE VACCINES? 

Vaccines contain preparations of weakened or dead bacteria or viruses that stimulate the immune system to produce antibodies against dangerous and sometimes deadly diseases. Vaccines reduce the risk of infection by working with the body's natural defenses to help it safely develop immunity to disease. 

 

When bacteria or viruses invade the body, they attack and multiply. This invasion is called an infection, and the infection is what causes illness. After the immune system fights the infection, the body is left with a supply of antibodies that help recognize and fight that disease in the future.


Vaccines help develop immunity by imitating an infection without actually causing one. The immune system responds the same to

vaccines as it does to a real infection and the resulting antibodies are able to recognize and fight the vaccine-preventable disease in the future.

 

After getting a vaccine, the body may exhibit minor symptoms, such as fever. Such minor symptoms are normal and should be expected as the body builds immunity.

ARE VACCINES SAFE? 

Vaccines are held to the highest standard of safety. The United States currently has the safest, most effective vaccine supply in history. Years of testing are required by law before a vaccine can be licensed. Once in use, vaccines are continually monitored for safety and efficacy. The CDC and FDA continually work to make already safe vaccines even safer.

 

Immunizations, like any medication, can cause adverse events. However, a decision not to immunize a child also involves risk. It is a decision to put the child and others who come into contact with him or her at risk of contracting a disease that could be dangerous or deadly.

 

The benefits of vaccines clearly outweigh their risks.

One of the best resources for up-to-date and reliable information about the safety of vaccines is The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, a member of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Vaccine Safety Net. 

We also recommend parents watch this video, which describes the journey of a vaccine from development through post-licensure monitoring. Learn about the three phases of clinical trials, vaccine licensing and manufacturing, how a vaccine is added to the U.S. Recommended Immunization Schedule, and how FDA and CDC monitor vaccine safety after the public begins using the vaccine.